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Trending: Best Places to Buy Ammo Online and [Buyer's Guide] 7 Best AR-15s When it comes to building your own AR-15, you’ve got two main options–buy it off-the-rack , or get the parts and build it yourself . But what do you do if you want a custom build , but just don’t have the time or gunsmithing skills to DIY it? This is where a third, far less common, option comes in–the semi-custom build. For a semi-custom build, you choose your own parts but have someone else build it for you.

[Review] Lionadi: Semi-Custom AR-15 Builder

[Review] Lionadi: Semi-Custom AR-15 BuilderTrending: Best Places to Buy Ammo Online and [Buyer's Guide] 7 Best AR-15s When it comes to building your own AR-15, you’ve got two main options–buy it off-the-rack , or get the parts and build it yourself . But what do you do if you want a custom build , but just don’t have the time or gunsmithing skills to DIY it? This is where a third, far less common, option comes in–the semi-custom build. For a semi-custom build, you choose your own parts but have someone else build it for you. But where do you even find a company that does semi-custom builds? Luckily for you, we’re here to talk about one of our favorites– Lionadi . Lionadi LRS Standard and URS Precison+ Who is Lionadi? Lionadi is a new company with fresh ways of approaching the AR-15 market. Veteran owned and operated, they are, in effect, more of an assembler than manufacturer. Lionadi logo, also found on their BCGs Their website is designed to allow you to choose the parts that you want in your rifle and cover a wide range of manufacturers such as Noveske, Wilson Combat, Faxon, Criterion, Geissele, Aero Precision, Magpul, and a LOT more. This gives you the power to order a “Franken-Rifle” that matches your exact needs, wants, and desires. Lionadi then builds the rifle, tests the rifle, and then sends it to your local FFL for you to enjoy. Who Is It For? This approach to the AR-15 isn’t going to be for everyone. Many of us that want a custom rifle will simply build it ourselves, but not everyone has the tools , understanding, or space for that. Just some of the tools you need to build an AR-15 Normally, if you didn’t want to or couldn’t build your own rifle, you would be regulated to buying someone else’s AR-15 with the specs that they offer and little choice in the matter. Lionardi offers a different path that melds the best parts of building a custom AR-15 build and the ease of buying a stock rifle. They also offer the service at a really good value. I’ll break down the numbers later, but after doing the math, I was shocked at how well this works out in the customer’s favor. What’s in the Box?! Since Lionadi is new and still finalizing their shipping methods, they asked me to pay special attention to the box and what is in it. SWAG. Lots and lots of SWAG. So I did. Just about every firearms manufacture in the USA includes extra goodies in their boxes of stuff, be it stickers, bottle openers, dry rub, or locks. Lionadi actually passes all of those goodies onto you! Shipped in the rifle bag–oh, by the way, they also ship their rifles in a real live rifle bag–were stickers, a cable lock, and, far more importantly, the Gessisle wrench adaptor AND a Geissele .750 Gas Block. Lionadi Swag and rifle bag In the build order I sent, I requested Faxon Gunner Profile barrels. Those barrels use a .625 gas block, but Lionadi also included the Geissele .750 Gas Block in my rifle bag as an extra goodie just in case I had a use for it. That actually worked out great for me since I was also building my own 6.5 Grendel upper at the time! And I’m told that Lionadi plans this to be standard practice for anyone who orders the gunner or pencil profile barrels. These extras feel nice. In the long run getting my stickers and swag isn’t really a huge deal, but the useful extras like the wrench adaptor and the gas block really add to the value that Lionadi offers. Plus, the rifle bag is actually decent. It was a better quality than many of my other bags and has about a half-inch of padding on each side. Parts List All of the parts in my builds were parts and manufacturers that I know and trust–many of them are part for part identical in rifles that I built myself. Since these are all proven products, my goal was not so much to test them but to confirm how well Lionadi built their rifles. Good ingredients are required for a great meal, but it’s still in the hands of the chef to finish the job. For the LRS Standard I went with these: LRS Standard Aero Lower Parts Kit Faxon 16" Gunner Barrel Geissele Maritime bolt Catch Aero Precision Gas Tube ALG Mil-Spec Trigger Geissele MK13 13" M-LOK Handguard Magpul MOE-K2+ Aero Precision Stripped Upper Magpul UBR Gen 2 Stock Lionadi Toolcraft Nitride BCG California: AR Maglock Gen 3 Radian Raptor-LT Charging Handle Lionadi LRS Standard and URS Precision+ with a Vortex Strike Eagle And the LRS Precision+ Upper: LRS Precision+ Faxon Gunner 20" Barrel Geissele MK8 15" Handguard Radian Raptor-LT Charging Handle Lionadi Toolcraft Nickle Boron BCG A2 Flash Hider After over 1,000 rounds and several range trips, I can safely say that Lionadi knows how to build a rifle. Can it Shoot? Oh yes, yes it can! Putting a little over 1,000 rounds (mostly Wolf Gold) through the LRS Standard and then another 250 through the LRS Precision+ upper I had a total of zero failures. Not a single one. And that is with having weird California fixed magazine, using cheap ass ammo, and only giving it an initial cleaning/lubing. Right in the feels… The AR-15 is one of the most reliable and robust semi-automatic rifles ever designed, but it still feels amazing to pick up a rifle and just have it work – always . Groups! Both the 16″ and the 20″ performed effectively exactly how I expected. Faxon is one of my favorite barrel manufactures and every single barrel I’ve had from them has proven to be outstandingly good despite the diet of fast food grade ammo I feed them. Using a "Vortex Strike Eagle" 1-6x the 16″ LRS Standard clocked in a 1.44 MOA group with Wolf Gold. Lionadi LRS Standard shooting Wolf Gold 55gr – 1.44 MOA And a more impressive 1.32 MOA with Federal Gold Metal 69-grain Sierra MatchKing. I honestly expected the Gold Medal to tighten the group up a little more than it did, but still not bad. Lionadi LRS Standard shooting Federal Sierra 69gr Matchking – 1.32 MOA URS Precision+ with it’s 20″ barrel, on the other hand, shot outstanding! Grouping Wolf Gold at 1.27 MOA. Lionadi URS Precision+ shooting "Wolf Gold 55gr" – 1.27 MOA And with the Federal Matchking ruling the day shooting 0.9 MOA! Lionadi URS Precision+ shooting Federal "Sierra 69gr Matchking" – 0.9 MOA There are several things I could have done to tighten up these groups, but I didn’t since I wasn’t trying to shoot uber precision. But if you were, I’d use a nicer scope than the Strike Eagle I shot with. I love my Strike Eagle, but it isn’t a hyper-precision scope. I also basically only ran 3 kinds of ammo–ever. Tula steel case, Wolf Gold, and the Federal Sierra Matchking. If you want to tighten your groups, you can. Doing the Math The LRS Standard Lionadi built for me sells for $1,324 shipped since they don’t charge extra for shipping and they don’t charge sales tax unless you’re in AZ. That isn’t cheap by any means, but for semi-custom work that isn’t bad either. I did want to break down the numbers though. I broke it down part by part and looking at average, what I could order right now prices (not MSRP but also no waiting around for mega-sales). The parts alone totaled up to just under $1,200 BEFORE shipping. Rough guesstimate: with shipping, the cost would be around $1,250 since this would require placing at least 4 or 5 individual orders. Plus, I would have to actually build the rifle . And that assumes I have all of the tools I would need to finish my build… of course, I do, but I’m not everyone. If you need tools you’re looking at another $100 bare minimum for a vice, roll punches, wrench, and a hammer. That said–I’ve never paid full retail for anything in my life. If you are like me and you’re fine waiting a year or more for the right sales for every build, then you could obviously get the parts for a good bit less than what I found at the time of writing this. And if you’re that person, then these rifles probably aren’t what you’re looking for. If you’re not a dedicated AR-15 builder… well, then these rifles offer an outstanding value –far better than I originally expected, to be honest. By the Numbers Reliability 5/5 Quality parts put together by someone that knows what they are doing is how you get a good rifle, period. Everything ran perfectly and ran on the whole range of ammo–from crap steel Tula to match grade Federal. Accuracy 5/5 Faxon makes great barrels and Toolcraft is one of the industry standards for BCGs, put together and they make a very accurate rifle. The 16″ clocked a respectable 1.4 MOA with cheap Wolf Gold and the 20″ pulled a 0.9 MOA with Federal Matchking. Ergonomics 5/5 This was my first time using 3 parts: the MOE K2+ grip , Geissele handguards , and the Magpul UBR stock. I highly recommend all three of these now. The UBR is not a cheap stock but it is rock solid and still adjustable! Looks 5/5 Lionadi did a great job putting this rifle together, everything is well fitting, no marks, and looks perfect. Better than any AR-15 I’ve ever built! Customization 4/5 The options on Lionadi are being updated and added to consistently. They’ve added a TON of options even in the couple of months from when I first heard about them to now. While they don’t have everything yet, they are getting close. Bang for the Buck/Value 4/5 This is going to depend on you a little. If you lack the tools or ability (or both) to build your own AR-15, then Lionadi is a GREAT value for you since you can get a custom rifle for barely over parts cost. But if you’re already building your own AR-15s, then this will still save you time–but not money. Overall Rating 5/5 Parting Shots Good rifles come from good parts. Every single part Lionadi uses is outstanding. Period. They also take their time and build the rifles right, have real people working their customer service, care about their end users, and are able to do it all for a fair price. Furthermore, they care about their product and their customer. And that really makes a huge a difference. If you want a semi-custom rifle built how you want it with the parts that you love most, then this is perfect for you. I would highly recommend them for those of us that don’t have the time or space to build our perfect rifle. Do you own a semi-custom AR-15 from Lionadi? If so, what did you think about the company? Tell us in the comments below! Don’t forget to check out our list of best AR-15 parts to help you choose what you want to include in your semi-custom build.

[Review] Daisy Red Ryder BB Gun: Adult & Youth Models

[Review] Daisy Red Ryder BB Gun: Adult & Youth Models

Trending: Best Places to Buy Ammo Online and [Buyer's Guide] 7 Best AR-15s Maybe you had a BB gun as a kid. Maybe your parents were cool with you learning the ins and outs of guns (mine weren’t). And maybe you’re just A Christmas Story junkie (I am). The Daisy Red Ryder Model 1938 in adult (pictured top) and youth (pictured bottom) Whatever the case, Daisy’s Red Ryder BB gun is probably on your radar. Sometimes you just need to sling tiny metal balls for funsies, so check out our review of two options from Daisy and prepare to relive your childhood. Or, if you’re like me and never had one as a kid, prepare to create adulthood memories. Worth it. Table of Contents Loading... Daisy The Company Daisy Outdoor is located in Rogers, Arkansas and is the oldest, biggest air gun manufacturer not only in the United States but in the world! If you trace the company’s roots all the way back you find yourself back in 1880 at the Plymouth Iron Windmill Co. In 1880 a guy called Clarence Hamilton started a watch repair business in Plymouth, Michigan, but he was quite the tinkerer, too. Hamilton ended up patenting an all-metal, vaneless windmill. Long story short the windmill didn’t exactly go well but his next product, an air rifle, was a seriously big hit. Enter the toy BB gun. The Daisy "Red Ryder Model" 1938 adult sized (left) and youth (right) Fun fact: the guy who made the first air rifle did so ten years before Hamilton created his and made it out of wood. Hamilton’s was made with metal, of course, making it unique. When Hamilton presented his new creation to the board member named Hough said “Boy, Clarence, that’s a daisy!” and that’s where the Daisy Outdoors name originated. Or so the story goes. In 1889 the "Plymouth Iron Windmill" Co. decided to make the Daisy air rifle their main product. They didn’t change the name of the company until 1895 but by then they’d already done such a successful switch from windmills to air rifles that business schools use their turnaround as an example to this day (really). Jump forward to 1938. That’s when Daisy signed the Red Ryder licensing agreement. It’s generally agreed in the business world that the Red Ryder agreement is the oldest constantly-in-force licensing agreement in the United States business world. Over the years Daisy survived the Depression – far better than most companies managed – entered into marketing agreements with other air rifle companies, and basically kicked ass. Without Daisy the BB gun world wouldn’t be what it is today. Safety First We all know the four golden rules of gun safety. For Daisy, safety has always been paramount and they’ve been pushing it in the ad campaigns since their inception. Today they’re one of the industry leaders in shooting safety and education. In fact, Daisy started working with local schools in 1948 to push safety and training. By 1956 they’d started the Training Services Department which worked alongside the American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, and Recreation to put BB guns into the phys ed curriculum at schools. You know, back when schools were reasonable about gun education. Vintage Red Ryder ad from the 1940s In the 1960s Daisy worked with U.S. Junior Chambers and started a nationwide youth shooting education program. Daisy published a Ten Lesson Curriculum for Shooting Education to help instructors teach kids gun safety. The curriculum covers safety, shooting goals, range time – everything. It can be downloaded on their website . Youth Red Ryder Model 1938 For more than eight decades this has been the classic Daisy Red Ryder BB gun. The Model 1938 is a lever-action style air rifle that I was, quite frankly, ecstatic to get my hands on. It’s a better fit for the kids than it is for me – so yes, it’s theirs – but it still brought a smile to my face. This year Daisy put it out in the classic, out-of-print packaging, too, making it even better. This year Daisy brought back the retro, out-of-print packaging for their youth and adult Red Ryder Model 1938s The Red Ryder Model 1938 has measures 35.4-inches overall and weighs 2.2 pounds, empty. It’s lightweight enough even petite four-year-old Lyla can handle it with no problem so your kids should be good to go. "The Model 1938" has a Red Ryder branded wood stock, wood forearm complete with forearm brand, and a smooth bore steel barrel. The cocking lever is as expected because this is, after all, a lever-action design. Factory sights are blade and ramp front sights and an adjustable rear sight. This model has a 650-BB capacity – those are .177-caliber BBs – with a maximum velocity of 350 feet per second and maximum shooting distance of 195 yards. It has a limited one-year warranty and a cross-bolt trigger block safety. The adult stock is two inches longer than the youth stock, making it way easier for us to shoot (although the youth one is still fun, too) Here’s the great thing about the Red Ryder. Because it’s an air rifle it’s legal to shoot in most areas – make sure you check your local regs before you start shooting – meaning it can be fired in places you can’t shoot firearms like your beloved AR-15. This is fantastic for kids because it means you can set up in your backyard to start teaching them the fundamentals of gun safety. Just remember you do have to adhere to safety rules; just because this is a BB gun doesn’t mean you can or should be irresponsible or reckless. I can’t help it. I love this packaging Daisy recommends the Model 1938 for kids age ten and up. That doesn’t mean it can’t be used by littles – like I said, four-year-old Lyla and six-year-old Ethan are the ones learning the ropes with this Model 1938 – it just means the younger the kids, the more supervision and assistance needed. Of course, just because your kid is ten doesn’t mean they don’t need to be watched or helped. How it works: the Model 1938 is an air rifle with a spring-powered cocking lever. Cocking the lever pulls the internal piston back which, in turn, compresses a small coiled spring and locks the piston into the sear. So yes, usual trigger action. Pulling the trigger releases the piston and propels it forward which triggers compressed air sending the BB through the barrel. I found the trigger on the Daisy Red Ryder Model 1938 to be surprisingly good for the price point. Sure, it’s a BB gun trigger, but it gets the job done nicely Loading the rifle is straightforward. One of the greatest things about the Red Ryder is that you don’t need to mess with C02 cartridges. You just push open the loading gate of the air rifle and pour BBs in – up to 650 .177-caliber BBs -and close it. Only one pump per shot is necessary. This isn’t a precision rifle but it doesn’t need to be (it is, however, relatively accurate). The purpose of Red Ryders is to give kids a platform to learn the basics of gun safety and use that’s simple and safe. Daisy Youth Red Ryder BB Rifle 46 at Amazon Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 46 at Amazon Compare prices (2 found) Amazon (See Price) Cabelas (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing That doesn’t mean you should let your kids shoot each other with a BB gun – please don’t – just that BBs give you greater flexibility than, say, an AR-15 or handgun. One of the coolest things I have for the kids is the Rocket Shot Target Launcher that works with empty cans and lets them take shots at the cans as they launch into the air. It’s ridiculously fun. Adult Red Ryder Model 1938 It’s true. I was stupid excited when Daisy put out a Red Ryder with an adult-sized stock. This is the same air rifle as the Model 1938 the kids have only it has a stock designed to fit adults. The wood stock of the air rifle is engraved with the classic Red Ryder logo and cowboy image That’s a good thing because I’ve spent time shooting the youth model and let’s just say I’m a bit big for it (or it’s a little small for me, one or the other). The adult stock is 36.75-inches in length meaning there are a couple of extra inches on the stock. It’s still small-ish but it’s big enough to make shooting it easier. And anyway who doesn’t want an excuse to get one of these for themselves? Now that there’s an adult Model 1938 you don’t have any reason not to go get one. Daisy Adult Red Ryder BB Rifle 48 at Amazon Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 48 at Amazon Compare prices (2 found) Amazon (See Price) Cabelas (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing You Want This Remember in A Christmas Story when Ralphie announces his desire for a BB gun? “I want an official Red Ryder, carbine-action, two-hundred shot range model air rifle!” Not only his mother but Santa Claus tell him he’ll shoot his eye out. Imagine Ralphie’s uncontained glee today at this 650-round, 350 feet-per-second Model 1938. He’d be in BB gun heaven. The Daisy Red Ryder Model 1938 isn’t only for Christmas, so get that out of your head. Teaching kids to shoot and have fun with BBs is a year-round deal. BBs are an excellent way to introduce your kids to firearms and it’s affordable, too. It only costs a couple dollars to load the Model 1938 with BBs and if you want the company’s official targets packs are only $2.99. Read the manual, use a good backstop, and have fun. Crosman 4.5mm Copper Coated BBs, 6,000 Count 8 at Amazon Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 8 at Amazon Prices accurate at time of writing 10/10 recommend getting one or more of these for your house, kids or no kids. We may have awesome rifles, shotguns, and handguns but we all have a Ralphie inside us secretly thrilled to shoot a Red Ryder BB gun. Go get one and let your inner child set free. By The Numbers Reliability: 5/5 Totally reliable. End of story. Ergonomics: 4/5 This isn’t an air rifle I’d expect to be ergonomically perfect. It does have the basics down, though, and fits most kids just fine. The adult model is still small enough it isn’t going to fit most adults as well as an actual rifle will but it is a lot more comfortable for us to use than the youth model. Accuracy: 4/5 It’s a BB gun. It isn’t meant to be precise. The Model 1938 is accurate enough for its purposes, especially if you stay around ten yards from your target. Remember, it only has a maximum velocity of 350 feet-per-second and those are little steel balls you’re slinging down-range. Precision isn’t the name of the game but you can easily stay on paper or shoot flying cans off the "Rocket Shot Target" Launcher. This air rifle is solid for learning the basics of marksmanship or just having a good time. Customization: 3/5 I dropped customization points to three because there isn’t much you can do to customize the Model 1938…but why would you? It’s fine as is and a nice addition to a gun collection. Really, it is. BB guns have a place of importance on firearms history you might not realize they hold and having at least one around is a good idea. Value: 5/5 What you get and what you spend depends on what exact model and package you look at, but every incarnation of the Red Ryder I’ve seen is a steal of a price. Daisy Youth Red Ryder BB Rifle 46 at Amazon Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 46 at Amazon Compare prices (2 found) Amazon (See Price) Cabelas (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing Both adult models and youth models are very cheap at around $35 for just the rifle, but packages are available that include things like ammo, shooting glasses, targets, and more for around $50 to $60. Daisy Adult Red Ryder BB Rifle 48 at Amazon Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 48 at Amazon Compare prices (2 found) Amazon (See Price) Cabelas (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing It’s a seriously good deal. Fantastic value. Plus, don’t forget that feeding these rifles is CHEAP. I mean, like really cheap. Crosman 4. "5mm Copper Coated" BBs, 6,000 Count 8 at Amazon Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 8 at Amazon Prices accurate at time of writing 6,000 pellets will run you about $8, that’s 0.0013 cents per round. Even the cheapest .22LR is normally around 4 cents per round at least. Overall: 5/5 Conclusion There’s almost no complaints about the Red Ryder Model 1938. Utter reliability, decent accuracy, and great bang-for-the-buck pricing. Ergonomics could be better and there’s not really any upgrade potential, but who cares? It does exactly what it should and it’s fun for both kids and adults. Daisy "Ryder Model 1938" 1938 (youth model) Daisy has been making these for 80 years and they definitely know their air guns. I love that this year’s air rifles come in the out-of-print packaging for an added level of nostalgia but the rifles are cool no matter what packaging they arrive in. These aren’t just for kids, either. This is just some good clean fun. But don’t forget your safety glasses! Did you have a BB gun as a kid? Getting one for your kids soon? Let us know in the comments! For some of the best safety equipment around, take a look at the Best Shooting Glasses and some Essential Shooting Range Gear ! Tested Shooting Glasses

The Survivalists Guide to Occupying Your Time

The Survivalists Guide to Occupying Your Time

Time can be your greatest friend or your biggest enemy in a survival situation. Consider the phenomenon of cabin fever, which turns people in close proximity against each other, or having to pass time as a group through the night; how about when you have no choice but to wait for rescue? Here are a couple tips on how you can keep your mind occupied and avoid the passing of time getting to you… “ A key ingredient in any survival situation is the mental attitude of the individual(s) involved.” FM21-76 US Army Survival Manual Quick Navigation Social Interaction Developing a Quiet Mind Scheduling Time Playing Cards and Other Games Skill-Building Music and Art The Use of Stimulants Social Interaction Social interaction is an essential part of human nature. Movies like I Am Legend and Cast Away portray this well – Robert Neville takes to placing mannequins over town, and Chuck Noland eventually starts speaking to Wilson, a Wilson-branded volleyball.  Many, recounting time served in the military, recall the social interaction between people the most; never discount its value. Developing a Quiet Mind Knowing how to meditate and quiet the mind is a vital skill; after a while, one becomes unaware of the amount of time that has passed and one is able to focus on the total absence of thought or, if needed, solving a particularly complex problem by focusing on the details. Practice meditation for at least ten minutes per day to start. Allow for thoughts to drift – this is completely normal. You can light a candle to aid in focus. Scheduling Time Schedule your time whether you are alone or in a group. Knowing what to do and more or less when will help take the edge off. Have a routine, even if it’s a simple one that starts with a walk, a swim or a morning coffee. Having a schedule will also help to avoid general chaos if and when in a group and divide the responsibilities equally. Also Read: The Prepper Learning Curve Playing Cards and Other Games Don’t underestimate what you can do with a deck of playing cards. Part of staving off boredom is keeping your hands and mind occupied and even when you are alone, cards can do just that. Groups of people can pass hours away by playing Poker , Blackjack, Rummy , Bridge, Snap or a range of other card games. The same is true for other games and puzzles – anything goes, as long as you’re keeping busy. Skill-Building Practice or learn a new skill. This is something which will undoubtedly come in handy in whichever situation you find yourself in, and if you have a large amount of time to kill you might as well put it to good use. Skills can include anything from getting to know the area to learning how to carve objects from wood. Music and Art Ancient tribes of the world are known for their music and art; both can be used as ways to relaxation, and you would be surprised how many art supplies can be made from what’s around you if you have nothing else. Simple pants and pigments can be made by grounding up natural substances – ochre is just one of many examples; charcoal can be made by charring wood. It goes without saying that it can be a more than sufficient distraction in times of need. Related: Fortifying Your Home The same is true for music – yes, it is also able to aid in meditation for people to attain a sort of trance state, and it serves the goal of keeping the mind and body occupied. The Use of Stimulants When a great deal of time has to be passed for reasons of safety, for example when keeping a look-out throughout the night, the use of (legal) stimulants such as caffeine is worth mentioning. Caffeine has been shown to increase alertness and wakefulness, which could be exactly what you need to get you through a dark, cold and dangerous night in the wilderness. Always take care with the use of stimulants : Check with a medical professional and avoid stimulants entirely should you have any type of heart condition. How have you had to pass the time? We’d like to hear more about your stories in the comments. Other interesting articles: Civil Unrest Survival: A Quick Guide to Safety SHTF vs TEOTWAWKI? Guide for 2020 5 Poisonous Plant Families the Survivalist Should Know Urban Survival Guide for 2020: All You Need To Know!

Ballistics Basics: Addressing Air Pressure On Bullet Flight

Ballistics Basics: Addressing Air Pressure On Bullet Flight

/* custom css */.td_uid_2_5f379d583ce65_rand.td-a-rec-img { text-align: left; } .td_uid_2_5f379d583ce65_rand.td-a-rec-img img { margin: 0 auto 0 0; } At extended ranges, air pressure alters bullet flight — and impact — more than you might think. How does air pressure influence a bullet's trajectory? Denser air slows a bullet, thus exposes to more of gravities effects. More air pressure, due to elevation or weather patterns, results in denser air. For shooting purposes, barometric pressure is of little use. Instead, station pressure provides the data required. Ballistic calculators are often required to figure out effects of air pressures on a bullet. In past articles, I’ve dissected how gravity and wind are the two main variables that affect your bullet’s path. Yes, other environmental variables matter, too; however, they only change how much of an effect gravity and wind will have. The reason your bullet falls more by the time it reaches a 900-yard target than it does for a 100-yard target is because it was exposed to gravity longer. Therefore, the longer it takes a bullet to reach the target, the more gravity and wind will move the bullet off of its original flight path. A Bullet’s Speed There are three variables that determine a bullet’s speed on its way to the target: The initial speed of the bullet The efficiency of the bullet The external and environmental variables In discussing a bullet’s speed, we’ve already covered the initial speed of the bullet and the aerodynamic efficiency of the bullet. Now it’s time to explore environmental variables. The environmental variables that affect a bullet’s path are: Related GunDigest Articles Ballistics Basics: Bullet Efficiency And Ballistic Coefficients Ballistics Basics: What Is Headspace? Ballistics Basics: Initial Bullet Speed Air pressure Temperature Humidity There are also things called “spin drift” and the Coriolis (and Eötvös) Effect that can change your bullet’s path. However, we’ll save those for future discussions. Air Density Each of the three listed variables can change the density of the air. Simply, a bullet doesn’t travel as well through denser/thicker air. Therefore, a bullet will slow down faster in dense, thick air than it will in less-dense, thinner air. Why does this matter? A bullet that slows down more will take longer to reach a target — and be moved off of its original path more by gravity and wind. If you are recoil-sensitive, it is always a temptation to let someone else sight-in your rifle, but it is much better if you do it yourself. Remember this: Denser air = slower bullet = lower impact on a target Going forward, we’re going to explore each of the three variables that affect air’s density individually because each are extremely important to understand. In this column, we’re going to explore air pressure. Can You Handle The Pressure? More air pressure results in denser air. The air’s pressure will change based on certain weather patterns and also the altitude. As a general rule, air pressure is lower the higher you are above sea level, and vice versa. This is because air actually has some mass and is pulled down by gravity. At higher altitudes, there are fewer air molecules being pulled down on your head than there are at lower altitudes. Compare this to water pressure. The deeper you go into water, the higher the pressure. The same phenomenon causes this — there’s more water above you that gravity is pulling down on.

The Ever-Evolving M24 Sniper Rifle

/* custom css */.td_uid_2_5f379d40a9dcb_rand.td-a-rec-img { text-align: left; } .td_uid_2_5f379d40a9dcb_rand.td-a-rec-img img { margin: 0 auto 0 0; } The GA Precision U.S. Army M24 is a stocky, super-accurate sniper rifle chambered in 7.62 NATO. The military’s shifting doctrine are the winds of change that continue to shape the Army M24 sniper rifle and its role in the field. Refinements to the M24 continued through 1986 and 1987, at which time the Army got completely involved in the program. The internal debate over cartridge chambering at this stage in the game had been narrowed down to the 7.62 NATO or .300 Win. Mag.; the big .338s were off the table, because shooters voiced concerns over excessive recoil. The Army settled on the 7.62, but those closest to the program made sure to keep the long action for future re-chambering to .300 Win. Mag., when logistics over ammunition could be worked out. It is unknown how many M24s are chambered in .300 Win. Mag. Before final approval, the guns needed to be evaluated under field stress, so the Army Special Operations devised a competition, in the summer of 1987, to put M24 contenders from two prospective commercial suppliers, Steyr and Remington, to the test. Both were excellent samples of the platform, but the Steyr’s cold hammer-forged barrel reportedly began to shift point of impact, as things heated up. The stock also warped. By contrast, the Remington shot consistently, making the decision an easy one. By the end of 1988, the Army had its sniper rifle, and instructors at SOTIC had a gun for their program. Remington would continue to supply Big Army with the new M24s through February 2010, ultimately producing 2,500 rifles over the life of the contract. Related GunDigest Articles First Look: Ithaca Precision Rifle Gun Auction: Marine Sniper Rifle Sells for $26,400 Gallery: 10 Most Influential Rifle Designs Five years before Remington’s fulfillment came to an end, Knight’s Armament Company had been awarded an Army contract to replace the M24 with its M110, a semi-automatic weapons system. That change had been influenced by Special Forces snipers operating, since 2001, in the Middle East. The advantage of the long-range semi-auto option quickly gained popularity with soldiers and, in 2008, the first Army unit went into battle, in Afghanistan, armed with M110s. Still, the fate of the M24 wasn't completely doomed, because the military finally came back around to the idea of the Remington 700 long action upon which it was built and the excellent .300 Win. Mag. cartridge. This line of thinking was also influenced by Middle East operations, where the .300 Win. Mag. was providing sniper teams a much more suitable gun at the 1,200-yard range, yet with the 1 MOA or better accuracy of the M24 platform (as opposed to the .50 BMG and its 2.5 MOA accuracy). Not unlike the international popularity of the prolific Mauser 98, albeit on a much smaller scale, other countries took notice of the M24. The Afghan military and at least seven other countries, including Iraq, Brazil, Georgia, and Japan, now use the rifle, and various police agencies and S.W.A.T. teams in the U.S. have adopted the once military-only gun for domestic law enforcement operations. The latest rendition of the M24 is the XM2010. This space age-looking rifle is built on the M24’s original Model 700 long action, but is chambered for .300 Win. Mag. It features a fully adjustable and folding stock known as the Remington Arms Chassis System (RACS), suppressor, and magazine. The optics have also been upgraded to the Leupold 6.5-20x50mm variable power first focal plane scope. The Ever-Evolving M24 The military’s shifting doctrine are the winds of change that continue to shape the M24 and its role in the field to this day. The classic design approved in 1988 is still available from Remington and is in use by the military in more or less its original configuration. But variants have also crept into the picture in the M24A1, M24A2, and M24E1/XM2010. The M24A1 and M24A2 are basically refined versions of the original, with a slightly different M40XB-style stock, detachable five-round magazine, modular accessory rail (for night vision), and a suppressor. The A1 is a 7.62 NATO gun, the A2 the .300 Win. Mag. version, and both are outfitted with Leupold’s Mark 4 M3 LR/T 3.5-10x variable scope.

Gun Owners : Dont be Part of the Problem

There are many subcultures in the firearms community. You have three gunners, hunters, cowboy action shooters, 1911 fanatics, and weekend plinkers to name a few. Chances are that we are all a cross over of several types of the shooting categories I listed. The common bond with all these groups is our shared love and respect of the firearms and the shooting sports as a whole. I would like to believe that despite our gun preferences and different backgrounds that we all as the firearms community and movement could work toward advancing the pro gun causes of the collective firearms community. The problem if I can call it that with the collective positivity is that there is a small segment of our gun community that seems hell bent on stopping the growth the the hobby by their actions. This is the small segment of our culture that I am addressing when I say Gun Owners, Don’t be part of the problem. We all know the type of personality I’m talking about, we collectively refer to him as “That Guy”. We Have all seen “That Guy” hell I’m willing to bet that some of us have been “That Guy”. Sometimes we have behaved in a manner consistent with douchebag behavior by our own choice, other times its without any real conscious thoughts, we just react and poof, were are acting like douchebags before we know it. It happens from time to time at the range or the office or even in the firearms industry itself. A person can come across as so aggressive or egotistical that they speak or act in a manner that honestly paints all gun owners in a negative light. There are literally dozens of these types on YouTube and millions of followers. This type of behavior is one that almost everyone I personally know in the firearms community works tirelessly to overcome. Beware “That Guy” is Everywhere We don’t have to go very far to see the negative effects of these types of people in the firearms industry and community. I’m sure we all have the same type of stories about the guy or gal at the local gun shop or big box store that we all cringe when we see him helping new shooters. That’s what seems to be the universal constant with these types of people they exhibit a lot of the same personality traits and tendencies. For fun we decided to list a few of them, the list could be a mile long but we kept it short. Attributes of “That Guy” Loud & Abrasive Has “Been there, done that” mentality Refuses to be open to ideas or contrary opinions If he doesn’t own “It” than its garbage Always seems to have some sort of Special Operations Sniper Friend who trained him Likes the phrase ” I wish someone would ….” The personality that I’ve described unfortunately isn’t unique to just the shooting range, your local office or the small gun shops, it also is in place in the larger firearms industry as well. As a professional writer I have been to SHOT Show in Las Vegas twice now and I can tell you that it exists to a smaller extent in the larger world of firearms manufacturing and importing. In my three plus years of writing and covering the industry I have seen first hand the backroom dealings and shady antics of people in the industry. The firearms world maybe large in terms of dollars but it’s relatively small in terms of knowing people. Employees move from company to company in this industry and networking is a huge key to many introductions and deals. A good reputation will open many doors, and a bad one will leave you with a stack of business cards and no return calls. There is a way to be a professional, and most people I have dealt with in the industry know that and act accordingly. All is Not Lost…How to Fight Back Against “That Guy” Mentality I’m not trying to paint a bad view of the firearms industry, but it is like every other type of business, there are good guys and not so good guys. The people I have met and worked with professionally are some of the nicest, most generous and professional people I have ever met in business. That is because they work hard to counteract the effects of the “That Guy” personalities that are out there. The bottom line when it all boils down is that they recognize a problem, and make conscious efforts to correct it in their business life and model. We can do the same thing in our personal lives either at the office, the range, or in our own sphere of influence. In closing I will tell you something a U.S. Army Green Beret once told me about team building “Being successful is about recognizing everyone brings something to the table and using what they brought”. This simple phrase has stuck with me as I have tried to apply it to the gun world. We need the new gun owners, We have new people coming into our sport all the time, and they bring an enthusiasm and eagerness to learn and tell all their friends how much fun it is to shoot and own guns. We need this growth to sustain the industry and spur gun sales. Growth in the amount of legal gun sales will help us in the long run as a hobby and an industry. We also need the older shooters who are willing to teach, train and the new generation. I love the firearms community as much as the next guy, hell I chose to be involved with it as a second career, squeezing it between college, a personal life and a 40 hour a week day job. BUT, We have to be better as a community about policing ourselves. I’m not talking about making a governmental organization to control ourselves, we already have that in the BATFE with all its regulations. I’m talking about taking simple small deliberate steps to stamp out the effects of “That Guy” mentality. Be willing to check your ego and talk to the new gun owner and listen to their points of view, be willing to call a call someone out when you see something that is detrimental to the gun industry. I’m not saying start a fight, I’m saying to act with a measure of common sense and handle the situation, Verbally. Get involved with Project Appleseed , the NRA Instructors Program or some other program, but just Do SOMETHING. Get in the game and show people that the “That Guy” personality is a small minority of the firearms community on a personal and professional level.

Summary

Trending: Best Places to Buy Ammo Online and [Buyer's Guide] 7 Best AR-15s When it comes to building your own AR-15, you’ve got two main options–buy it off-the-rack , or get the parts and build it yourself . But what do you do if you want a custom build , but just don’t have the time or gunsmithing skills to DIY it? This is where a third, far less common, option comes in–the semi-custom build. For a semi-custom build, you choose your own parts but have someone else build it for you.